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Thread: How many 'voip accounts' do I need on a SIP phone?

  1. #1
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    Default How many 'voip accounts' do I need on a SIP phone?

    Another newbie question, but one I can't seem to find a definitive answer for. Bear in mind that I only really have experience with key phone systems.

    With our existing key system, we have five PSTN lines, and 16 extensions. All of the phones ring on all incoming calls, and anyone can answer any incoming call just by picking up their (ringing) phone. To make an outgoing call, we dial 9 for an outside line and then dial the call.

    We're considering installing a QuadroM8L system, and we'd like it set up (initially) to work in much the same way - I understand that's possible.

    The question is, with the SIP phones (we're considering Yealink), how many 'voip accounts' do I need on each phone? Common sense suggests just one voip account is all you need, because the phone registers with the M8L, and the M8L handles everything else, like call hold and call transfer.

    However, I read somewhere on the web that you need one 'voip account' on each phone for each 'potential' call on the phone - so if you had one call in progress and one call on hold, you'd need two 'voip accounts' on each phone. That doesn't sound right to me, but is it true?

    So, as far as running a system as I've described on an M8L, do I need IP phones with one voip account, or two, or six, or whatever?

    Regards, and thanks in advance,
    Peter

  2. #2

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    Suggest you initially keep the 5 PSTN lines for incoming calls and review to reduce after the M8L is fully operational and you can see the calling patterns. Having one IP PSTN (VoIP line) will be very useful and generally it is more cost-effective. Anyway, in the Call Routing you can define to fallback to PSTN if the IP PSTN line is busy. Over time, you can reduce the PSTN lines and increase the IP PSTN lines depending on your calling pattern and traffic.

    What we have found is that the features on the Quadro M8L will enhance the service level and provide many functions to users. Group call pickup is available and there are other options.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
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    Thanks, tsim, but I don't think I made the question clear enough.

    Different IP telephones (not the M8L) have various numbers of VOIP lines - some might have 6, or 3, or 1, or whatever.

    What I was asking was whether I need an IP phone with multiple lines when used with the M8L, or whether I only really need an IP phone with one line.

    Regards,
    Peter

  4. #4

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    There are many options open to you from IP phones with 6 lines to 2 lines (or 1). In practice, most users only need 1 line but having additional lines can be beneficial depending on the role of the user, e.g. reception, and also perhaps using the other line for 'backup' use when the IP PBX is down.

    Perhaps other members would like to share their experiences and suggestions.

  5. #5

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    Once you decide on a particular handset and features that it provides then ask questions how do I ......

    There are many ways to skin a cat....


    Not that I'd skin a cat mind you - fish thats another story - or is it road kill...



    K

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSComs View Post
    Once you decide on a particular handset and features that it provides then ask questions how do I ......
    My worry is whether I am cutting myself off from some possible avenues in my choice of phone, particularly in the "number of lines" specification (often called VOIP accounts in IP phone data sheets), simply because I don't understand how things work.

    I'd have thought that the IP PBX handles everything internally, such as putting calls on hold, transferring calls, and so on. So, the IP phone should only need one "line", and that one line registers to the IP PBX. That makes sense in my view, but my view might not agree with reality :-)

    So, what options does having more than one line on an IP phone provide that I don't get with a one-line phone? I can see that it might allow me to use an ITSP line outside of (and unknown to) the IP PBX, but that's not something I'd want to do - everything should go through the IP PBX.

    One person that I talked to said that they recommend that normal IP PBX users have at least a three-line phone, and that the receptionist needs at least a six-line phone. I can't see why, if all calls are via the IP PBX, and the person wasn't able to explain it to me.

    If the *only* difference between my choice of IP phones is the number of lines, what difference does it make to me when using them with, say, a Quadro 6L or M8L? Do I *need* more than one line? Is more than one line "better" in some way, and if so, how?

    Peter

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by pjetson View Post
    My worry is whether I am cutting myself off from some possible avenues in my choice of phone, particularly in the "number of lines" specification (often called VOIP accounts in IP phone data sheets), simply because I don't understand how things work.

    I'd have thought that the IP PBX handles everything internally, such as putting calls on hold, transferring calls, and so on. So, the IP phone should only need one "line", and that one line registers to the IP PBX. That makes sense in my view, but my view might not agree with reality :-)

    So, what options does having more than one line on an IP phone provide that I don't get with a one-line phone? I can see that it might allow me to use an ITSP line outside of (and unknown to) the IP PBX, but that's not something I'd want to do - everything should go through the IP PBX.

    One person that I talked to said that they recommend that normal IP PBX users have at least a three-line phone, and that the receptionist needs at least a six-line phone. I can't see why, if all calls are via the IP PBX, and the person wasn't able to explain it to me.

    If the *only* difference between my choice of IP phones is the number of lines, what difference does it make to me when using them with, say, a Quadro 6L or M8L? Do I *need* more than one line? Is more than one line "better" in some way, and if so, how?

    Peter
    So PJetson who ever you are - if you provide the requirements - post them here you will get the respective view points - if you are unsure - obtain a handset that has many line keys / account keys as possible.

    1 x Line/Account key = 1 x conversation, hold a call make a call and receive another = 3 x Line/Account keys under most circumstances.


    K

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSComs View Post
    So PJetson who ever you are
    I'm sorry, have I offended you?

    I'm a 56yo computer and electronics engineer, working for a small Melbourne (Australia) company who manufacturers and distributes barcode readers and other automatic ID devices ( http://www.asp.com.au ).

    I have (from more than 30 years ago) a fair amount of analogue telephone knowledge (and interest), but very little experience in voip and sip. I always strive to understand what I am involved with, and recommendations for equipment purchase often fall to me.

    The company I work for currently has an Exicom/Goldstar key system, with 5 PSTN lines and 16 extensions. It is very much on its last legs. Despite an almost complete lack of information around on this system, over the years I have managed to work out how to program it, although I'm far from an expert.

    The company is now interested in installing an IP PBX - firstly as more or less a drop-in replacement for what we have now (as much as is possible), and secondly to likely eventually add VOIP trunks.

    The company already deals with Alloy, so it seemed natural to look at Alloy's IP PBX range, and the Quadro 6L looked like the perfect match. However, just as I was about to recommend it, it disappeared from the epygi web pages, and I have since found out that it has been discontinued.

    The Quadro M8L looked to be the next best match, but it's a lot more expensive and has features that we will never use. The 2x and a 6FXO gateway has also been suggested, as you will know since you are also following my other thread on this forum.

    We currently have one completely separate voip line installed here (from our ISP iiNet), using a Linksys PAP2 ATA and a DECT cordless phone. We have this line purely for test purposes, to see how well (or otherwise) a VOIP line compares to a PSTN line, quality-wise.

    We have an ADSL2+ Annex M internet connection, and we're perhaps just 200m from the local (Ormond) telephone exchange, so it's a high-speed connection.

    Does that answer your "Pjetson who ever you are"? Hopefully that question was just a quip of some kind and not an indication of animosity.

    I really am legitimately interested in a Quadro IP PBX, but I also have questions. My apologies to others following this thread if my explanation of "who I am" is off topic.

    Peter

  9. #9

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    No animosity at all - just thought you might have been hiding behind a bogus name thats all.


    But as I said Peter, if you have a scenario of how the telephones are to be used, there are many ways to skin a cat so to speak.


    You might still be able to get away with a 2x with pstn and sip trunks - that system will cater for 8 concurrent calls. It is light on voicemail so it realy depends on call flow within your office.

    Receptionist duties or many people have their telephones ring or do you have an idea to use an automated attendant to redirect the calls to the appropriate department / extensions?

    Depending on the choices, will depend on which way you need to go to select the handsets.

    Im not being vague, im suggesting to you that there are different ways from cheap to dear.

    Kev

    Quote Originally Posted by pjetson View Post
    I'm sorry, have I offended you?

    I'm a 56yo computer and electronics engineer, working for a small Melbourne (Australia) company who manufacturers and distributes barcode readers and other automatic ID devices ( http://www.asp.com.au ).

    I have (from more than 30 years ago) a fair amount of analogue telephone knowledge (and interest), but very little experience in voip and sip. I always strive to understand what I am involved with, and recommendations for equipment purchase often fall to me.

    The company I work for currently has an Exicom/Goldstar key system, with 5 PSTN lines and 16 extensions. It is very much on its last legs. Despite an almost complete lack of information around on this system, over the years I have managed to work out how to program it, although I'm far from an expert.

    The company is now interested in installing an IP PBX - firstly as more or less a drop-in replacement for what we have now (as much as is possible), and secondly to likely eventually add VOIP trunks.

    The company already deals with Alloy, so it seemed natural to look at Alloy's IP PBX range, and the Quadro 6L looked like the perfect match. However, just as I was about to recommend it, it disappeared from the epygi web pages, and I have since found out that it has been discontinued.

    The Quadro M8L looked to be the next best match, but it's a lot more expensive and has features that we will never use. The 2x and a 6FXO gateway has also been suggested, as you will know since you are also following my other thread on this forum.

    We currently have one completely separate voip line installed here (from our ISP iiNet), using a Linksys PAP2 ATA and a DECT cordless phone. We have this line purely for test purposes, to see how well (or otherwise) a VOIP line compares to a PSTN line, quality-wise.

    We have an ADSL2+ Annex M internet connection, and we're perhaps just 200m from the local (Ormond) telephone exchange, so it's a high-speed connection.

    Does that answer your "Pjetson who ever you are"? Hopefully that question was just a quip of some kind and not an indication of animosity.

    I really am legitimately interested in a Quadro IP PBX, but I also have questions. My apologies to others following this thread if my explanation of "who I am" is off topic.

    Peter

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by KSComs View Post
    No animosity at all - just thought you might have been hiding behind a bogus name thats all.
    My surname really is Jetson.

    Peter

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